The other day, I left this comment on an entry at the Cleveland Poetics blog:

“I think some of my best poems are ones I planted in a drawer for 15 or 20 years and then dug out and cultivated using tools I didn’t have back then. If I had broadcast them way back when, they would not have thrived. Many plants require burying to grow. And even if they don’t grow, but decompose in the ground, they help make the soil more fertile for other plants.”


Yesterday, Geoffrey Landis, seeing a poem in my paragraph, responded by editing it into this:

John Says–

Some of my best
poems
are ones I planted
in a drawer
for 15 or 20 years
and then dug out
with tools I didn’t have back then.

If I had harvested them
way back when,
they would not have thrived.
Some seeds must be buried to grow.
And even if they don’t grow,
but decompose in the ground
they just make the soil more fertile.



Today, though pleased, I couldn’t resist tinkering with it a bit more to create this:

Cultivation

I think some
of my best poems
are ones I planted
in a drawer for
15 or 20 years 
then dug out
using tools I didn’t have
back then.

If I had pulled them
way back when
they’d not have thrived since
some seeds need buried
to grow.

Even when they don’t grow
but decompose in the ground
they
make
the
soil
more
fertile.

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